CZ 2075 RAMI: The Little CZ That Could

Adorably small, yet thick enough for comfortable shooting, the RAMI is a gun that turns heads wherever you take it.

The brainchild of Czech designers Radek Hauerland and Milan Trkulja, the RAMI was released in 2006, though Trkulja created a subcompact prototype that appeared strikingly similar to the RAMI back in the mid-‘90s. This was in response to the Colt/Cz short-term partnership in the ‘90s as Colt, who was floundering again, agreed to potential dealings with CZ, who were attempting to break into the lucrative US market.

Colt, who had always struggled with double-action semi-autos partnered with CZ to release the Colt Z40, a double-action-only .40 S&W pistol that was very much an oversized RAMI. However, when Trkulja showed Colt executives his early RAMI mockup and models, it was flatly ignored, as Colt wished to focus on the Mustang’s development instead.

The Colt/Cz Z40, serial #1
Image courtesy RIA

Thankfully, the rejection did not stop CZ, who reached out to CZ-USA and US business partners in the year 2000, who were given a demonstration with an early functioning prototype. Results were extremely positive, and after some minor tweaks, the little pistol was on its way and was released onto the market in 2006.

Originally in .40 and 9mm, the RAMI team toyed with ideas such as a .357 SIG model, a .45 GAP model, and even a low-power model with a fixed barrel and modified Cz.83 magazines that utilized a new 9mm rubber ball round for “non-lethal” self-defense in countries with heavy restrictions on civilian firearms use. These would all remain in the prototype stage, however. The only notable variant to make it into production would be a short-lived polymer-frame model.

The RAMI is a subcompact DA/SA pistol designed for the concealed carry market. It is available in .40 S&W or 9mm (the author’s is a 9mm BD model). Capacity is 10+1 or 14+1 with the factory extended mag (7+1 and 9+1 respectively in .40 S&W models), though it will accept all Cz.75 pattern magazines.

The regular “D” model has 3-dot “combat” sights and a manual safety. What I chose, the “BD” model, has Tru-Dot night sights and a decocker. I also slapped on a set of wooden grips. The RAMI ships with a 10rd and 14rd magazine, as well as a polymer sleeve that slides onto it to smoothly blend into the frame. Overall a nice touch.

The RAMI is a bit on the chunky side for a subcompact, but the upside to this is that it fills the hand unlike most others in its class. I have big hands, but even with the flush 10 round magazine, I never found myself fumbling to find the best grip. It holds and points very naturally. And of course, the large capacity for a sub-compact is quite nice.

Holster choice is important. I found, amusingly, that the RAMI’s grip is comfortable, but almost disappears into my belt line, and consequently the IWB holster. It’s so small that it’s difficult to rapidly grasp, which affects my drawing speed. This seems largely due to how low the holster rides and is not the fault of the gun.

The 14rd magazine offers much more grip area at the expense of concealment

Once you get the hang of your draw, however, the RAMI BD is quite a fun gun to shoot. The 3-dot night sights are easy to pick up, and the marginally increased weight from the alloy frame compared to many polymer frame 9mm subcompacts, along with the width and beavertail in the frame, makes for a remarkably comfy gun. Rapid hits out to 25 yards on a plate gave me no more issue than a Glock 19 would. It feels remarkably similar to a larger handgun.

At the end of the day, would I recommend the RAMI? Absolutely. It offers an impressive amount of firepower for such a small package, and while the extra thickness may turn some people off, the trade off is greatly increased comfort and shoot-ability, arguably the important aspects of any dedicated self-defense gun.

CTG

CTG

CTG likes cheap whiskey and oddball retro stuff.

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